Ma Vie En Rose: The Colors of This Alaska Summer

Snow has arrived in Fairbanks, and its arrival covers all what was left of this past summer. 

I have been neglecting what I love to do most. The thing that allows me to breathe in the purpose of my existence. We all do that from time to time. But, I have been taking advantage of the luxury in  laziness. 

I shouldn’t refer to such absence from writing as a form of otiose-ness. While my fingers may not be typing the many stories, plot lines, narrative, imagery, scenes, and the emotions each character expresses, they still occupy my mind leaving me with a melancholy sense of being.  

What do I do then to avoid such creative responsibility?  I turn to the beauty around me. I turn away for a few moments from the complexity of the characters in my stories. Why imagine and write about that one moment when a character profoundly realizes a devastating truth when I can conjure up fresh cucumber gazpacho? Or why spend a minute on structuring a story within a story when the fresh picked blueberries I bought from the Farmers’ Market is waiting to be baked into a scrumptious Paleo blueberry bar?  

Why sit in front of my laptop when I am in the heart of Juneau enjoying my family, and quite proudly relishing the eldest son’s Emmy win? 

I believe the answer to all these questions is because I can, and one should always take a hiatus.  

However, I do believe in signs that tells one to snap out of it and get back on it. 

The primadonna and I were running our usual Saturday errands one summer morning. I was shopping for gorgeous vegetables at the local Co-op Market when I bumped into one of the few people who inspire me, and she just happens to be this genuinely amazing writer. After a bit of chit-chat, I walked away and took the coincidence as a sign that I need to get back to my true purpose (Susan, if you’re reading this –thank you always). 

Here we are.  Here I am.

This Alaskan summer almost felt as though it came through as a whisper–you hear it disappearing way before its time. 

 

Pink and Reds

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Blooms on the University of Alaska Southeast Campus. Juneau, Alaska. July 2019. Photo by JAH.
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Peonies. Fairbanks, Alaska. June 2019. Photo by JAH.
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Roses. Fairbanks, Alaska. June 2019. Photo by JAH.
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Sarah Bernhardt pink peony. Fairbanks, Alaska. June 2019. Photo by JAH.
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Peony bloom. Fairbanks, Alaska. June 2019. Photo by JAH.
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Red Rose. Fairbanks, Alaska. June 2019. Photo by JAH.
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(Reds) Salmon caught by the husband. Fairbanks, Alaska. June 2019. Photo by JAH.
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Salmon dressed in citrus. June 2019. Photo by JAH. Fairbanks, Alaska.

 

Green

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Broccoli and Cauliflower from the Tanana Valley Farmers Market. Photo by JAH. July 2019. Fairbanks, Alaska.
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Basil from the garden. Photo by JAH. July 2019. Fairbanks, Alaska.
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Pesto from the basil. July 2019. Photo by JAH. Fairbanks, Alaska.
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Chinese Broccoli. July 2019. Photo by JAH. Fairbanks, Alaska.
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Chinese Broccoli, sauteed. July 2019. Photo by JAH. Fairbanks, Alaska.
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Tomatoes and Basil from the Garden. Photo by JAH. July 2019. Fairbanks, Alaska.

 

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Caprese Salad. July 2019. Photo by JAH. Fairbanks, Alaska.

 

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The makings of a Gazpacho. hoto by JAH. July 2019. Fairbanks, Alaska.
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Cucumber Basil Gazpacho. Recipe from The Defined Dish. hoto by JAH. July 2019. Fairbanks, Alaska.

 

Yellow and Purple

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Blooms on the UAS campus. Juneau, Alaska. Photo by JAH. July 2019.
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Pansies on the University of Alaska Fairbanks campus planted by Provost Emeritus Henrichs. Photo by JAH. Fairbanks, Alaska. July 2019.
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Yellow blooms on the UAF campus. Photo by JAH. Fairbanks, Alaska. July 2019.
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Bryan’s wild irises. Photo by JAH. Fairbanks, Alaska. July 2019.
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Farmers’s Market and garden bounty. hoto by JAH. July 2019. Fairbanks, Alaska.
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Jen Singh peony. Photo by JAH. Fairbanks, Alaska. July 2019
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Side angle. Photo by JAH. Fairbanks, Alaska. July 2019.
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That kimchi I made. Photo by JAH. July 2019. Fairbanks, Alaska.
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From Sesame. Farmers Market. June 2019. Photo by JAH. Fairbanks, Alaska.

 

Gold

Only one word for this one….

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While we were having dinner at a restaurant–we found out that the First Born won his first Emmy. I got teary eyed for being so happy for him while Chloe was getting teary eyed because her hamburger wasn’t seasoned properly. Tomas Hoppough, Journalist. Photo by future daughter in-law and also Emmy winning journalist Meghan Lopez. Denver, Colorado. July 2019.

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